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Sunday, Feb. 18, 2001
Through Spokane's eyes

SUPPORT NOT TOLERATED. Freedom Rider James Zwerg stands bleeding after an attack by white pro-segregationists at the greyhound bus terminal in Montgomery, Ala. Zwerg remained in the street for over an hour after the beating since "white ambulances" refused to treat him. (Bettman/Corbis photo)
The early 1960s Lunch-counter sit-ins
and the Freedom Rides

Spokane had a lot on its mind in the early 1960s.

The city was bitterly arguing about changing its form of government. Front-page stories in The Spokesman-Review detailed claims of questionable work by a consultant hired to assess the impact of the change...

... Seldom reported in Page 1 headlines was the growing tension in the South that would produce one of the biggest cultural changes in 20th-century America.
Read complete essay

In this report
  • Emelda and Manuel Brown
  • Flip Schulke
  • Ads in the newspaper
  • In the paper

  • A bumpy ride to freedom
  • Editorials from the early '60s
  • Letters to the editor

    Off-site Links

  • Congress Of Racial Equality
  • African-American history
  • Greensboro Sit-ins



    Audio not playing? Download the latest version of free RealPlayer software.




  • A look back
    Putting it in perspective

    Newspaper adThe newspaper advertising from 40 years ago tells a lot about our culture at that time. The radio listings were longer than the television listings; cigarette ads were big and glamorous. Prices seem unbelievably low. Advertisements for freak shows with midgets and characters such as Al Kluber "the rubber-faced man" appeared regularly.
    These ads are reflections of what the world was like during the civil rights movement.

    Have a story or memory to share? You can contact Rebecca Nappi by phone at (509)459-5496 or (800)789-0029 ext. 5496 or by e-mail at rebeccan@spokesman.com.




    Spokane and Spokane Valley, Wash., Coeur d'Alene, Idaho and the Inland Northwest
    ©Copyright 2014, The Spokesman-Review